Myringoplasty

Myringoplasty is a surgical procedure used to repair a perforated eardrum. During the procedure, the surgeon typically grafts a small piece of tissue onto the hole in the eardrum to promote healing and restore normal function. This can help improve hearing and prevent infections in the middle ear. Myringoplasty is often performed under general anesthesia and can be done on an outpatient basis in many cases. After the procedure, patients usually need to take precautions to protect their ears from water and other irritants while the eardrum heals.

Tympanoplasty

Tympanoplasty is a surgical procedure performed to repair the middle ear structures, particularly the eardrum (tympanic membrane) and the tiny bones behind it (ossicles). This surgery is typically done to treat conditions such as chronic ear infections, perforations of the eardrum, or damage to the ossicles caused by trauma or disease. During tympanoplasty, the surgeon may use tissue grafts from the patient's own body or synthetic materials to reconstruct the eardrum and restore hearing function. The procedure is usually performed under general anesthesia and may require a hospital stay, depending on the extent of the repair needed. After surgery, patients may need to take precautions to protect their ears and may experience temporary changes in hearing and temporary Tinnitus may occur as the ear heals. Overall, tympanoplasty aims to improve hearing and reduce the risk of recurrent ear infections.

Myringoplasty With Grommet Insertion

Myringotomy with grommet insertion is a common surgical procedure used to treat conditions affecting the middle ear, such as chronic ear infections or fluid buildup behind the eardrum.

During the procedure, the surgeon makes a small incision in the eardrum (myringotomy) to drain any fluid or infection present in the middle ear. A tiny tube, known as a grommet or tympanostomy tube, is then inserted into the hole in the eardrum to allow continuous ventilation and drainage of fluid from the middle ear space.

The grommet helps equalize pressure between the middle ear and the outside environment, prevents fluid buildup, and promotes healing of the eardrum. This procedure is usually performed under general anesthesia and is often done as an outpatient procedure, meaning patients can usually return home the same day. Grommets typically fall out on their own after a few months to a year, and the eardrum usually heals without any permanent damage. This procedure is particularly common in children who experience recurrent ear infections or fluid buildup.